Five-Star Review: “Never Settle for a Fairy-tale”

Want to start from the beginning of the Once Upon a Reality series? Kristen A. Scearce has given ‘Till the Last Petal Falls a five-star review: 

 

During my Psychology classes in college, we discussed how various characters have psychological issues: popular cartoon characters, the cast of “Winnie the Pooh,” and the vast majority of the Disney Princesses. Belle is no exception, and this book explores that idea beautifully, no pun intended.

Jolee answers a Craigslist ad which sounds too good to be true, and she finds herself in the mountains of Aspen, tutoring a shut-in with some very serious issues of his own. As time goes by, she learns [more] and more about this man, and most of it is not good. However, she sticks by him, hoping to “fix” him with her love.

Sound like a recipe for disaster?

I used to teach a rehabilitation class for men convicted of domestic violence, and this book definitely delves into that dynamic head-first. It’s a real eye-opener into the lives of those involved in those situations, from both sides of the coin as well as an outsider’s perspective. Comparing it to the story of “Beauty and the Beast” really adds a whole new layer to it, as most of us either grew up with that story/movie or fell in love with it because of our kids/grandkids/etc. It’s a crazy thought, but the more you think about it, the more you realize Belle suffered from Stockholm syndrome as well as battered-woman syndrome, and that HEA Disney ending is not the one generally associated with those situations.

Bravo to the author for writing this cross-examination of a beloved children’s story and shedding some light on this serious issue while also maintaining a gripping novel.

 

 

Thank you, Kristin! Remember, you can still get a copy of Till the Last Petal Falls in either paperback or e-book format, as well as the second installment of the series, To Dwell in Dreams.

 

 As always, I appreciate any and all reviews of my work, posted on Amazon, B&N or Goodreads- it helps me as an author to see what I’m getting right, and what I still need to work on with my next project. 

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To Love is to Be Loved

“There is the great lesson of ‘Beauty and the Beast,’ that a thing must be loved before it is lovable.”

― G.K. Chesterton

 

 

For many, this is one of the first lessons that we learn regarding love and how it works. Love begets love, right? So how do you explain domestic violence? Is it because you did not ‘love’ the other person enough? Is it because your ‘love’ wasn’t real enough? That you didn’t mean it enough? Speaking as a woman who has been both physically and mentally abused by those I have loved for years at a time, I can promise you that this kind of an explanation just doesn’t cut it.

When does it become okay to release yourself from the conventional ‘stick-it-out’ love and get out of a horrible relationship? When does it become okay to admit that you can love someone all you want, but you cannot force someone to change if they do not wish to? When does it become okay to admit that, just because the object of your desire doesn’t love you back, it doesn’t mean that you are unloveable? 

I would love to have an open discussion about this, as this was an honest challenge for me to tackle when taking on a re-imagining of such a classic, and sometimes classically misleading, fairytale. What are your thoughts on this?

50 Likes!

Already 50 likes on the Facebook page for Till the Last Petal Falls! I’m really excited about all of the support already pouring in this early.  I have some big plans for when this comes out, and I really hope you all enjoy it. I think this is a series that really has the potential to bring a new kind of light to extremely important women’s issues- something I feel that this world needs desperately right now.

 

As for the second manuscript, I have finished hand-writing up to chapter seven and typing up to the fourth chapter. All of my anxiety about the first release is really fueling my fire for the rest of the series!

Hard at Work!

So now that dealings with the publisher have been settled on, I’ve begun drawing up ideas for the cover art. I know I personally have a specific idea in mind, but I was wondering if anyone else has their own opinion- are you drawn more to minimalist covers (where the cover would have, perhaps, a single item/emblem on it- think Hunger Games or the Shadow Hunter series) or to busy covers (where the cover looks like it has a scene from the book on it- think any romance novel you’ve ever seen, or something like The Mortal Instruments)?

 

I’ve also begun initial draft work on the second installment of the series. Anyone want to guess what fairy-tale that one is going to tackle?